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Wednesday, May 30, 2012

The Lord and Eleanor by Lindsay Townsend



The Lord and Eleanor by Lindsay Townsend
Publisher: Ellora’s Cave Publishing
Genre: Historical
Length: Short Story (55 pges)
Heat Level: spicy
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Fennel

Their love breaks all bounds. Richard is lord of Wykeford—and Eleanor’s lord. She is a former bondswoman, now free. When they meet, their lives change forever as a love that can’t be denied burns between them. She is strong and fierce. He is a gentle warrior. Together, they fight for their future against all odds.

But there is one in the lord’s household who’s not pleased and who will stop at nothing to break Richard and Eleanor apart, even at the cost of murder.


The clever beginning of The Lord and Eleanor, with the mention of ‘rope burns’, pulled me right into the story instantly. Why rope burns?  I needed to know more.

Ms. Townsend’s gentle writing style makes perfect sense of this intriguing beginning to her story and in few words paints a picture of Eleanor, her heroine, strong in adversity, caring beyond measure and prepared to stand up for her rights against deep seated prejudice.

Cleverly, she depicted Richard, her hero and local Lord, as a man ‘wanting’ and for a few moments I wondered how the author intended to take the reader over the gap between ‘wanting’ and loving. I need not have worried. Richard has loved and lost and has a caring and instinctive nature that recognizes his interest for Eleanor as what it is; the stirring of something far stronger than lust.

The small community and all the prejudices that come with such an environment, are woven into the plot, as is the antagonist. The Lord and Eleanor is short and packs in a lot of detail, emotion and tension and if I have a small nit to pick with Ms. Townsend’s story it's the outcome of the antagonist; unless, that is, she intends to bring him into another story.

Ms. Townsend paints vivid word pictures of her settings, and weaves action and emotions into them with apparent ease.

The secondary characters, including the children all have their parts to play, to carry the story forward and the bonding between the children was utterly believable.

The author left this reader sighing with satisfaction and closing the book with the word ‘charming’ running through my mind.





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